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NTIA launches new website for C-SCRIP

November 30, 2022 by NTIA

NTIA’s Communications Supply Chain Risk Information Partnership (C-SCRIP) has launched its new website, in time for Infrastructure Security Month in November. This updated site is a one-stop shop for resources on improving the security of your organization’s supply chain, both physical and digital.

The new site offers the following:

  • Supply chain security resources;
  • Dedicated page to 5G and Beyond technologies;
  • Dedicated page to NTIA’s Internet for All programs;
  • More information about federal grant programs, free training sessions, and events;
  • RSS subscription for regular updates; and
  • Mailing list sign-up for additional information, including the bi-monthly C-SCRIP Update.

C-SCRIP – created by NTIA at the request of Congress – brings together the federal government, telecommunications companies and equipment suppliers to share information about supply chain security risks.

Keeping the nation’s critical infrastructure safe is important to our national and economic security. The C-SCRIP information-sharing program demonstrates NTIA’s commitment to assisting small, medium, and rural communications companies in identifying and managing threats to their operations. 

Any questions or comments about the C-SCRIP program may be directed to cscrip@ntia.gov.

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Turns One: A Progress Report on Internet For All

November 15, 2022 by NTIA

One year ago today, President Biden signed the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, or Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which tasks the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) with administering grant programs totaling more than $48 billion to connect everyone in America to affordable, reliable high-speed Internet service. It’s a historic investment, providing resources to close the digital divide on an unprecedented scale. Because of these efforts, families across the U.S. will have expanded access to high-speed Internet service and digital skills training that will improve education, jobs, and healthcare.

 

The Internet For All initiative is moving with speed to deliver on the Infrastructure Act’s goal.  We’re proud of what we’ve accomplished in the first year, which includes:

OMBI Identifies Barriers, Helps Close the Digital Divide

November 03, 2022 by NTIA

Marking one year of expanding high-speed Internet access in minority communities, NTIA’s Office of Minority Broadband Initiatives (OMBI) today released its inaugural Annual Report. This report, required by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 (CAA), details OMBI’s accomplishments over the office’s first year, identifies barriers to high-speed Internet access in minority communities, and outlines the office’s role in achieving digital equity across the United States.

Established in August 2021 within NTIA’s Office of Internet Connectivity and Growth (OICG), OMBI is the Department of Commerce’s leader in promoting equitable broadband access and adoption at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), and their surrounding anchor communities. Given their decades of investment in minority students and their communities, these institutions are effective catalysts for the expansion of high-speed Internet service.

“The first OMBI Annual Report marks a milestone in our mission to address high-speed Internet deployment challenges in vulnerable communities,” said NTIA Administrator Alan Davidson. “The newly created Office of Minority Broadband Initiatives will lead the way to ensure that these critical anchor institutions and the communities they serve have access to high-speed, affordable Internet service.”

ITS provides technical understanding of 5G and radar altimeter emissions issues

October 25, 2022 by NTIA
Specialized equipment deployed at the Table Mountain Radio Quiet Zone to measure 5G transmitter emissions.
Specialized equipment deployed at the Table Mountain Radio Quiet Zone to measure 5G transmitter emissions.

NTIA’s research laboratory, the Institute for Telecommunication Sciences (ITS) recently released a much-anticipated report that will aid regulators' understanding of 5G signals that are near adjacent to the radio altimeter band.

ITS measured the potential impact of Fifth Generation New Radio (5G NR) systems in the 3700 and 3980 MHz band on airborne radar altimeter (RADALT) receivers operating between 4200 and 4400 MHz. The study, NTIA Technical Report TR-22-562, "Measurements of 5G New Radio Spectral and Spatial Power Emissions for Radar Altimeter Interference Analysis," found that most 5G transmitters emissions are focused toward the ground and produce a low level of unwanted 5G emissions within the RADALT spectrum band. This reduces the potential for 5G-to-RADALT harmful interference scenarios and increases the likelihood that unwanted emissions problems can be solved by installing or retrofitting RADALT receivers with more effective radio frequency power-rejection filters.

Celebrating National Digital Inclusion Week and Efforts to Close the Digital Divide

October 07, 2022 by Angela Thi Bennett, NTIA Digital Equity Director

The Internet is an essential communications tool that enables access to work, education, healthcare, and justice. Once a luxury, access to affordable, reliable, high-speed Internet is now a necessity.    

Despite its importance, millions of people in America cannot afford Internet service. Millions have no Internet access at all. And many who do, still face slow connection speeds and inadequate service.

This week, NTIA is celebrating National Digital Inclusion Week and the people who are working every day to connect all of America with affordable, reliable high-speed Internet. In our blog, we analyzed Internet Use Survey data on the disparities around Internet adoption and how people view affordability. On social media, we highlighted how people across the country are addressing digital equity challenges.

The theme of this year’s Digital Inclusion Week is “Turning Our Moment into Movement,” as advocates for digital inclusion prepare to make use of unprecedented federal investments in connectivity. Digital inclusion is a core part of the Biden-Harris Administration’s Internet for All initiative. We know that a wire to a family’s home doesn’t help them if they can’t afford the connection. And an affordable connection isn’t enough if they don’t have the tools to succeed online.

New Analysis Shows Offline Households Are Willing to Pay $10-a-Month on Average for Home Internet Service, Though Three in Four Say Any Cost is Too Much

October 06, 2022 by Michelle Cao, Policy Specialist, and Rafi Goldberg, Senior Policy Advisor, Digital Equity, Office of Policy Analysis and Development

Affordability is a core part of the Biden-Harris Administration’s Internet for All initiative. We know that access to an Internet connection isn’t true access unless everyone can afford that connection.

During Digital Inclusion Week, we are analyzing NTIA’s Internet Use Survey data that highlight disparities in Internet adoption. Our previous blog discussed some of the barriers facing the 24 million households that do not use the Internet at home.

Our analysis shows affordability as a driving factor around why some households continue to remain offline, confirming that cost of service is an essential part of increasing Internet adoption.

To dig into this issue more, NTIA added a new question to the 2021 NTIA Internet Use Survey. We asked households not using the Internet from home: “At what monthly price, if any, would your household buy home Internet service?” This new survey question was a result of suggestions received from the public in response to our Request for Comment published in 2020, along with the results of two rounds of cognitive testing conducted by experts at the U.S. Census Bureau.

Among other improvements, this process also resulted in a change to how we ask offline households for their reasons for non-use of the Internet at home, with interviewers now reading all answer choices rather than simply marking down choices that most closely resemble stated reasons.

Switched Off: Why Are One in Five U.S. Households Not Online?

October 05, 2022 by Michelle Cao, Policy Specialist, and Rafi Goldberg, Senior Policy Advisor, Digital Equity, Office of Policy Analysis and Development

Internet access means access to education, healthcare, jobs, and entertainment. It’s essential to full participation in our modern economy. Still, NTIA data show that about one in five U.S. households are not connected to the Internet at home.

President Biden’s Internet for All initiative is working to connect everyone in America to affordable, reliable high-speed Internet. With NTIA spearheading the initiative, we know it’s important to make data-driven solutions and assess who is not online and what barriers are keeping them unconnected.

This week is Digital Inclusion Week, and we are analyzing NTIA’s Internet Use Survey data on the disparities around Internet adoption, including why households are offline, the cost households are willing to pay to get connected, and what we’re doing to address the digital divide.

While a majority – 58% – of the 24 million offline households express no interest or need to be online, there is also a large proportion who say they can’t afford home Internet service (18%). Regardless of their stated reasons for non-use, offline households have significantly lower incomes than their online counterparts. This suggests that even after overcoming other barriers, cost may be an additional challenge for many offline households.

Understanding Barriers to Home Internet Use

Scoring Big on your Middle Mile Application Series: Budget Information

September 28, 2022 by NTIA

The September 30, 2022, application deadline for the Enabling Middle Mile Broadband Infrastructure Program is just days away. Our aim is to help applicants submit complete, informed, and high-quality applications. This post focuses on the Budget Information section.

So here’s how to Be Complete and Score Big!

Budget Information

The Budget Information section is the third major section of the application. It is where applicants will have the opportunity to showcase their financial success as well as the sustainability of their project.

Another component relevant to this section is the “Letter of Credit.” The Letter of Credit is not required at this point in the application process, but a letter from a bank, whereby the bank commits to making a Letter of Credit available if your application is selected for award, is required. The objective is to review financials that show success and a pro forma to demonstrate that this project has sufficient resources to complete the project.

Scoring Big on Your Middle Mile Application Series: Project Information

September 28, 2022 by NTIA

Who Are Middle Mile Providers?

Middle mile service may be offered by a wide range of entities, from traditional retail Internet Service Providers, large technology companies that do not offer retail Internet service at all, or electric utilities that increasingly recognize their capability to transform the communications market. Regardless of who deploys and operates them, middle mile connections are crucial to connectivity and competition.

The Enabling Middle Mile Broadband Infrastructure Program is a $1 billion program funded by President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law for the construction, improvement or acquisition of middle mile infrastructure. If you’re reading this, you’re likely looking for tips on how to “score big” as you finalize application ahead of the September 30, 2022, deadline.

Project Information

The Project Information section is the second major section of the middle mile grant application. This portion provides space for applicants to describe the details and timeline of their project. It includes an executive summary, a “level of need narrative”, and a description of government and community involvement.

Scoring Big on Your Middle Mile Application Series: Understanding Review and Applicant Information

September 28, 2022 by NTIA

Why Middle Mile Matters

Middle mile infrastructure bridges the gap between where information is stored and the people interacting with it – it's an essential part of reliable, high-speed Internet access. Because of the nation’s middle mile networks, anyone in America can transfer data across the world, enabling community, competition, learning, and well-being.

Middle mile infrastructure may carry traffic via undersea cables that stretch to the farthest American territories, or it may “backhaul” wireless traffic for an antenna mounted on a wireless network tower to the provider’s wired network through fiber-optic connections. It may bring high-speed Internet to previously unserved Tribal or Native lands or may simply enable connectivity in urban neighborhoods where no connections were previously available.

The Enabling Middle Mile Broadband Infrastructure Program is a competitive, $1 billion program funded by President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law for the construction, improvement or acquisition of middle mile infrastructure. The application period for the program is currently open, and eligible entities are encouraged to apply to participate in the program. The application window will close on September 30, 2022. 

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